Australia in command against Windies

Australia took command of the final Test in Jamaica as West Indies closed day two 256 runs adrift at 143-8.

Steve Smith made his highest Test score but was out one short of a maiden double century as Australia were dismissed for 399.

Fast bowler Jerome Taylor was the pick of the West Indies attack, with career-best figures of 6-47 from 25 overs.

The Windies lost three wickets within the first 12 overs of their reply, only Jermaine Blackwood (51) passing 30.

Smith, who resumed on 135 with his team on 258-4, is only the eighth batsman in Test history to be dismissed for 199 and the first since England’s Ian Bell in 2008.

The 26-year-old hit the first two balls of the afternoon session for four and appeared set to become only the third Australian, after Neil Harvey and Steve Waugh, to make a double century at Sabina Park when he was lbw and the ninth wicket to fall.

Having struck three times before tea, Australia claimed their fifth wicket of the evening session with final ball of the day.

Jason Holder had an lbw decision by umpire Ian Gould off Mitchell Johnson overturned earlier in the over but the Australian pace bowler then had a successful review of his own when Veerasammy Permaul was given out caught behind.

Michael Clarke’s team won the first match of the series in Dominica

by nine wickets

and are on course for a fourth successive series win in the Caribbean.

They begin their defence of the Ashes against England in Cardiff on 8 July.

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Manus Island: Australia’s Guantanamo?

Inside camp on Manus Island

Around a thousand asylum seekers are locked up on Manus Island

Head to Australia by boat. End up in a place like Papua New Guinea.

That in essence is the message at the heart of Australia’s asylum seeker policy.

You might be seeking a new life in one of the world’s richest countries but you’ll wash up in one of the world’s poorest.

Papua New Guinea’s Manus Island is a place Australia does not want the world to see.

Dubbed by some “the Guantanamo of the Pacific”, it is home to one of Australia’s off-shore detention centres, where around a thousand asylum seekers are locked up.

It is extremely difficult for journalists to get visas to go there. So we travelled undercover, posing as tourists.

We managed to smuggle our camera past Australian officials and reach the camp.

View of Manus Island camp (June 2015)

The BBC travelled under cover to Manus Island as it is hard for journalists to gain access

We found asylum seekers, their faces pressed against the fences, some of whom have been stuck in Manus for almost two years.

Many have fled the misery of the world’s war zones – such as Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan – but now find themselves imprisoned, seemingly indefinitely.

Riots

Manus Island is far from the Promised Land.

Over the past year the detention centre has been at boiling point.

There have been riots in which one Iranian asylum seeker was killed.

Hundreds have been on hunger strike.

Some even stitched their lips together in protest.

One man reportedly swallowed razor blades in desperation.

People on Manus are scared to talk.

But we managed to speak to one Middle Eastern man, Ahmed (not his real name), who spent 18 months locked up inside the detention centre before being moved to a more open prison on Manus.

“My situation in detention was very, very, very terrible,” Ahmed told us.

“We were living in one room two metres squared, four people. It’s unfair.

“The Australian government broke the majority of our human rights. They don’t have any plan for us.”

Gate to Manus Island camp

Ahmed described his situation in detention as “terrible”

Ahmed told me he fled his home country, having tried to expose corruption inside the business where he was working.

He also said he has publicly renounced Islam, something which could see him facing the death penalty back home.

“They will kill me if I go back,” Ahmed said.

He left his family behind but says he had no option.

“I have just one sister and I really love her. I love my parents and it is very hard to tolerate this situation without my family. But I don’t have any choice.

“I am trying to start my life – my real life.”

Ahmed is one of around two dozen asylum seekers who have agreed to be resettled on Manus Island as a refugee.

It meant he was able to leave the detention centre, but his situation has only marginally improved.

Market in Papua New Guinea

Australia is paying aid to PNG in return for resettling refugees there

He now lives in a heavily guarded “resettlement centre.”

Ahmed is allowed out and about in the day time; many of the refugees can be seen jogging or cycling along the roadside to pass the time.

But he is not allowed to work, and he has to stick to a strict curfew between 6pm and 6am.

Skills

Like many of the asylum seekers he is well educated, with a degree and a professional qualification.

“There are doctors, teachers, engineers, carpet makers. They are intelligent people. We could use their skills,” one of the security guards on Manus told us.

He didn’t want to give his name for fear of losing his job.

“I feel sorry for them. They’re human beings. They want their freedom.”

But to get that freedom, they might have to agree to make Papua New Guinea their home.

Deterrence

In 2013, under the Labor government of Kevin Rudd, Australia did a deal with PNG, agreeing to pay the impoverished Pacific nation around AU$400m (US$300m; £200m) in aid if it agreed not only to house the detention centre but also to resettle refugees.

The message was clear: asylum seekers trying to reach Australia’s shores by boat, no matter how desperate, would not be resettled there.

The Australian government defended the decision, saying the aim was deterrence, to stop desperate asylum seekers drowning at sea.

It worked.

Up until 2013 thousands of asylum seekers were trying to make the perilous journey to Australia by boat.

Hundreds died in the process.

Two years later, the number attempting the journey has been reduced to virtually zero.

Australia’s navy has engaged in a policy of forcibly turning boats back.

And now the Prime Minister Tony Abbott has refused to deny reports that Australian officials had even resorted to paying people smugglers tens of thousands of dollars to abort their journeys.

Some might say that’s a bit like paying a bank robber, not to rob banks.

But Mr Abbott said his government was using all manner of “creative strategies” to stop the boats, including methods that he described as “by hook or by crook.”

‘Boomerang aid’

On Manus Island reaction to Australia’s policies is mixed.

People waiting at a market in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea is a poor country

On the one hand the detention centre has provided hundreds of jobs for local people who work as security guards.

But in terms of the AU$400m of aid promised for Papua New Guinea as part of the deal, many local people say they’ve seen little of that money.

“It is like boomerang aid,” says Nahau Rooney, a community leader on Manus.

“They bring the money but Manus is getting maybe 1%, maybe 10%. But most of the major contracts are going to Australian companies.”

Australia’s so-called Pacific solution has worked and is probably supported by the majority of Australians.

It has stopped the boats.

View through fence to an area where detainees are, on Manus Island, PNG (June 2015)

Reputation

Tony Abbott has said Europe should be following Australia’s example in tackling the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean.

But the problem Europe is facing and the numbers involved are on a far, far greater scale.

And Australia’s policies have come at a cost to the country’s reputation as a welcoming nation.

Human rights groups have branded Australia’s methods cruel and inhumane.

The United Nations even said the treatment inside places like Manus Island was tantamount to torture.

For the thousand or so asylum seekers stuck on Manus their future is bleak.

They are the world’s unwanted.

Map of Manus in relation to Australia
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Australia and asylum

  • Asylum seekers – mainly from Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Iraq and Iran – travel to Australia’s Christmas Island by boat from Indonesia
  • The number of boats rose sharply in 2012 and early 2013. Scores of people have died making the journey
  • To stop the influx, the government has adopted hard-line measures intended as a deterrent
  • Everyone who arrives is detained. Under a new policy, they are processed in Nauru and Papua New Guinea. Those found to be refugees will be resettled in PNG, Nauru or Cambodia
  • Tony Abbot’s government has also adopted a policy of tow-backs, or turning boats around
  • Rights groups and the UN have voiced serious concerns about the policies and accuse Australia of shirking international obligations

Australia asylum: Why is it controversial?

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VIDEO: Inside Australia’s secretive asylum camp

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has refused to deny reports that his border officials have paid thousands of dollars to people smugglers, to get them to turn around a boat load of migrants trying to get to Australia.

Thousands of asylum seekers are being held in off-shore detention centres which the UN has branded inhumane.

Australia does not allow journalists to visit the centres but the BBC’s Jon Donnison travelled undercover to Papua New Guinea to reach one such camp.

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Australian workers ‘stressed and fat’

australian public

A new study has shown that the average Australian employee is stressed and overweight

Australia’s workforce is affected “in a major way” by poor mental health, stress and obesity, a new study has found.

The average Australian employee is stressed and overweight – about half the 30,000 employees surveyed were physically inactive, the report found.

The study, by the University of Wollongong in partnership with Workplace Health Association Australia (WHAA), spans 10 years of data.

Workers also showed other risk factors.

The report found that 65.1% of the employees had reported “moderate to high stress levels” and that 41% had psychological distress levels considered to be “at risk”.

The WHAA said that trends around employee health had been examined over a 5-to-10-year period and that the industries covered included banking and finance, legal, transport and storage, in both metropolitan and rural areas.

The study said its objectives were to present an analysis of employee health data from the five organisations, all members of the WHAA, who participated in the project.

Productivity impact

fast food

Dr Lang says lack of activity and the availability of fast food are having a bad impact on Australia’s workers

Dr John Lang, WHAA’s chief executive, told the BBC that the average employee “was seeing a 2.4% reduction in productivity, on average, per risk factor”.

Risk factors listed in the study include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, physical inactivity, psychological distress, smoking and obesity.

“So if the average employee has four risk factors – that’s four times a 2.4% reduction in productivity,” Dr Lang said.

“And this means our workforce is being impacted in a major way by their poor lifestyle and physical health. It’s a global problem in the Western world, but the US is probably a bit worse that we are.”

Work life balance

girl doing sport

Average Australian workers are generally not making enough time for hobbies and sport, the WHAA says

“People will tell you, when they’re not exercising, that the biggest worry they face is a lack of time,” Dr Lang explained.

But he said employees were working longer hours, commuting for longer periods and generally not making enough time for hobbies and sport, or so-called displacement activities.

“And that, of course, is a major driver of weight gain, because lack of activity, quick and easy food choices and the availability of fast food just makes the whole thing, what we call, an obesogenic environment,” he told the BBC.

“When you’re thinking about things that are not related to work and family, and those high-level things in your life, that is a wonderful balance.

“But we don’t’ seem to be getting as much of that anymore.”

Dr Lang said the answer was in a better work-life balance.

“Companies are trying hard to get a bit of life balance in there – and they preach the gospel about the balance that we should have.

“But at the end of the day, they do tend to propagate long working hours, and now Australia has one of the longest – if not the longest – working hours in the world.”

The study concluded by saying some positive trends in health outcomes had been found over the 10-year period, but that overall, organisations needed to continue efforts to create workplaces conducive to better mental health.

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Australian navy ‘paid smugglers’

Migrants from Bangladesh, Myanmar and Sri Lanka arriving in Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara province, after they were intercepted en route to New Zealand by the Australian navy

Migrants returning to Indonesia said their crew had been paid by the Australian navy to turn back

Migrants on a boat headed for Australia have told the UN that the crew was paid by the Australian navy to turn back.

James Lynch, a spokesman for the UN Human Rights Council (UNHCR), told the BBC that passengers saw smugglers being paid after the boat was intercepted.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott on Friday admitted using “creative” strategies to stop migrant boats but refused to go into detail.

The country’s immigration and foreign ministers denied payments were made.

“The boat that was rescued by the Indonesian navy on 31 May – we have interviewed the 65 passengers and they have said that the crew received a payment,” said Mr Lynch.

He said the passengers – 54 from Sri Lanka, 10 from Bangladesh, and one from Myanmar – were transferred to a customs boat for four days “before being put on two boats and sent back to Indonesia”.

He added: “Mr Abbott says the reason is to save lives because people risk their lives on the boats, and I agree, but I’m not sure putting them back on boats and sending them back is the answer.”

‘Wrong signal’

Mr Lynch said Australia had a responsibility under UN treaties, which it had signed, to see if any of the migrants were in need of international protection.

He accused Australia of “sending the wrong signal” to other countries in the region – including Myanmar, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand – which the UN is trying to persuade to allow migrants to disembark.

Boat of asylum seekers off Christmas Island (June 2012)

Australia has a zero tolerance approach to migrant boats approaching its territory

Indonesia’s foreign ministry said it was “very concerned” about the alleged payment.

The Indonesian navy said it intercepted the boats on their return and arrested the crew, who said they had each been paid A$5,000 ($3,900; £2,500) to turn back.

Local police chief Hidayat told AFP news agency: “I saw the money with my own eyes.”

Speaking to Radio 3AW on Friday morning, Mr Abbott refused to deny that a payment had been made, saying simply that “creative strategies” had been developed to stop the migrant boats.

“We have stopped the trade and we will do what we have to do to ensure that it stays stopped,” he said.

Under Australia’s controversial policies, no migrants and asylum seekers are allowed to reach its territories by boat. They are instead intercepted at sea and turned back or taken to detention facilities on the island nation of Nauru and on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea.

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Australia and asylum

  • Asylum seekers – mainly from Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Iraq and Iran – travel to Australia’s Christmas Island by boat from Indonesia
  • The number of boats rose sharply in 2012 and early 2013. Scores of people have died making the journey
  • To stop the influx, the government has adopted hard-line measures intended as a deterrent
  • Everyone who arrives is detained. Under a new policy, they are processed in Nauru and Papua New Guinea. Those found to be refugees will be resettled in PNG, Nauru or Cambodia
  • Tony Abbott’s government has also adopted a policy of tow-backs, or turning boats around
  • Rights groups and the UN have voiced serious concerns about the policies and accuse Australia of shirking international obligations

Australia asylum: Why is it controversial?

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Prolific Smith rescues Australia

Steve Smith hit his fifth century in six Tests as Australia reached 258-4 on the opening day of the final Test against West Indies in Jamaica.

After Jerome Taylor struck twice in his first three overs without conceding a run, Smith (135 not out) shared 118 in 34 overs with Michael Clarke (47).

Smith is the only man to hit more than 2,000 Test runs in the past two years.

Australia, who

won the first Test

by nine wickets, next play England in the first Ashes Test in Cardiff on 8 July.

Having arrived at the crease in the first over of the match when David Warner fended to third slip, Smith completed his ninth century in his 28th Test.

“The ball was swinging around a little bit, a bit of seam on it. It was quite hard initially and then it got easier as the day went on,” the 26-year-old said.

Smith recorded his maiden Test hundred against England at The Oval in August 2013, the start of a run that has seen him score 1,849 runs in 17 Tests at an average of 77.04.

“For the last 12 months I’ve been nice and patient, let the bowlers get in areas where I want them to bowl and picked them off,” he said. “It worked well again.”

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Australia yet to allow gay marriage

A couple hold each other during a rally at Taylor Square in support of Marriage Equality on May 31, 2015 in Sydney, Australia

Australia’s gay community has lobbied hard for same-sex recognition

The majority of Australians support same-sex marriage but unlike their conservative counterparts elsewhere, Australian politicians are making hard work of the issue.

The UK and New Zealand have backed change but Prime Minister Tony Abbott remains opposed.

Declaring himself the last holdout in his own family, the conservative Catholic Australian leader, whose sister is in a same-sex relationship, does not support gay marriage.

Officially, neither does his Liberal Party. On the other side of the political fence, the Labor Party has also dragged its feet on the issue.

Irish lead

Seizing the momentum from the recent Irish referendum supporting gay marriage, Australia’s Labor opposition last week rushed a same-sex marriage bill into Parliament. But former Labor leaders have opposed gay marriage in recent years.

Opinion polls suggest most Australian adults support legalising same-sex marriage. So, why are their politicians so reluctant to change with the times?

A mix of long-held conservative views, and some MPs’ fears they could lose their seats if conservative voters turn their backs on them, go some way to explain the conundrum, say political watchers.

A gay couple kiss in Dublin Castle Square as the result of the referendum is relayed on May 23, 2015 in Dublin, Ireland

Despite the strength of the Catholic Church, many Irish people support gay marriage

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Why support marriage equality?

  • More than half of Australian same-sex partners would marry if they had the choice
  • 80% of Australians in same-sex relationships support marriage equality even if they do not wish to marry
  • De facto couples, including gay couples, do not have immediate access to all relationship entitlements, protections and responsibilities
  • A marriage certificate allows married partners to easily prove their legal rights if challenged, for example in emergency situations

Source: Australian Marriage Equality

One man’s ‘deep, romantic wish’ to marry his partner

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Last July, a poll by research company Crosby Textor found 72% support in Australia for legalising gay marriage – almost double that of a decade ago.

Crosby Textor managing director Mark Textor says the silent majority “have spoken in the clearest possible way and said ‘get on with it'”.

Mr Textor argues the subsequent solid UK and New Zealand conservative election wins prove support for gay marriage is not politically dangerous.

“I just think they are imagining electoral monsters that don’t exist,” Mr Textor says of MPs worried about losing their seats.

“The conservative Christian [groups] make a lot of noise about this but at the end of the day, they are so small in number that it doesn’t matter,” he says.

Tony Abbott poses with his family after being sworn in as the 28th Prime Minister of Australia in 2013 in Canberra, Australia

Mr Abbott’s sister Christine Forster (bottom left) “respectfully disagrees” with her brother

The government adjourned debate on the opposition’s bill but Mr Abbott has declared his MPs will decide whether to have a free or “conscience” vote when the matter eventually comes before them.

However, New South Wales Liberal Senator Concetta Fierravanti-Wells says same-sex marriage “is not a conscience matter”.

“Marriage between a man and a woman is a core policy of the Liberal Party,” Senator Fierravanti-Wells says.

“This is not a change that the Parliamentary Liberal Party can make without extensive consultation with those thousands of party members for whom marriage is a fundamental bedrock belief.”

In Australia, state and territory governments have tried to legislate for same-sex marriage but run foul of two Liberal prime ministers opposing change – John Howard and Mr Abbott.

In 2004, the Howard Government amended the Marriage Act to specify marriage was between “a man and a woman”.

Newly married gay and lesbian couples pose for a photograph at Canberra's Old Parliament House, December 2013.

The federal government overturned same-sex marriage laws in the Australian Capital Territory

Conservative federal governments have twice used their powers to overturn laws passed by the Australian Capital Territory legislature sanctioning same-sex unions.

Labor Prime Ministers Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard also opposed gay marriage. Mr Rudd subsequently changed his view – but not the law.

In 2009, his Labor government expanded same-sex couples’ legal entitlements, amending 85 Commonwealth laws to confer on them many of the same rights as those legally married. But the definition remained.

In 2011, the Labor Party’s policy-making national conference endorsed gay marriage but passed a separate ruling that MPs be allowed a conscience vote.

Church influence

As pressure increases for change, pressure against is rising too.

Resistance from the churches is influential, with Australia’s Catholic bishops issuing a pastoral letter entitled “Don’t mess with marriage”.

Labor has a long affiliation with the Catholic Church but Deputy Labor leader Tanya Plibersek says it is a “gross oversimplification” to suggest her party is divided along religious lines.

“Not all Catholics have a problem with same-sex marriage,” she says.

The head of Australia’s Maronite Christian church, Bishop Antoine-Charbel Tarabay, has urged his members to contact their MPs to protest against any change. The church is influential in western Sydney where the Liberals hold a number of marginal seats.

“Please share with them what marriage means to you and your family and ask them to uphold the true meaning of marriage,” the bishop said in a letter to his congregations.

Senator Fierravanti-Wells believes it is a common view in migrant communities.

A woman walks past posters in Sydney advertising a rally supporting same-sex marriages, June , 2015

The push for gay marriage accelerated after Irish voters supported it in a recent referendum

“Marriage and family values resonate strongly amongst our culturally and religiously diverse communities,” she says. “I believe there would be strong opposition to changing the definition of marriage.”

What next?

There are now three bills before the Australian Parliament proposing to legalise gay marriage. The Greens hope for a vote on theirs by November.

Following one from Liberal Democratic Senator David Leyonhjelm and Labor’s effort, there may yet be a fourth, with bipartisan sponsors. None are guaranteed to be voted on this year.

Mark Textor argues the overseas experience should inform Australia’s response.

“Has the world ended in Ireland? No,” Mr Textor declares. “Are children being taught gay sex in school? No. Are there plagues of locusts and devils on horses? No. They got on and just did it.”

He believes Australia will eventually do the same.

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Eight critical after Australia crash

Ute crash pic 09 June 2015

The crash caused a gas bottle to explode, igniting the blaze

Eight people are in critical condition after a truck hit a cafe in Queensland, Australia, on Tuesday, engulfing the building in fire, say health officials.

The crash caused a gas bottle to explode at the Serves You Right Cafe in Ravenshoe, south of Cairns.

The eight critical patients, with up to 80% burns, were among 20 people hurt in the explosion and fire in the small farming town.

Queensland authorities have described it as the state’s biggest burns event.

Six people have already been transferred to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young said at a news briefing.

Two more of the critically injured will be transferred to the Brisbane hospital on Thursday.

Queensland Ambulance Service Assistant Commissioner Rod Sheather said p

CCTV footage showed the explosion flinging customers out of the cafe and across the pavement.

Some people staggered from the building, their clothing on fire, as others rushed to put out the flames.

The explosion blew out both sides of the building and the fire took an hour to bring under control.

It is not known what caused the vehicle to veer off the road into the cafe although there are some reports the driver may have had a heart attack.

‘Horrific things’

Ravenshoe Community Centre chairperson Priscilla Clare said it was amazing anyone survived the explosion.

Ms Clare said a group of about eight local senior citizens were inside the cafe at the time, having just been briefed by local firemen about fire safety.

“People have witnessed horrific things,” Ms Clare told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

“I was talking to people and I did not recognise them” because of their burnt hair and faces, she said.

The decision to transfer burns patients is always made with caution, said Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service’s executive director of medical services Paul Cullen.

“Serious burns affect more than just the outside of the body; they cause major issues with other body systems, and so moving critically ill people is always, of course, a challenge,” he told ABC.

Counsellors are on hand to support victims, witnesses and the broader community.

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USA Women 3-1 Australia Women

Megan Rapinoe scored twice as the USA started their Women’s World Cup campaign with a 3-1 win over Australia.

The number two ranked team in the world are early leaders of Group D, following Sweden’s 3-3 draw with Nigeria.

Rapinoe opened the scoring for the USA and – despite Lisa De Vanna’s equaliser for Australia – she had her second after the break, before Christen Press put the game out of reach in Winnipeg.

In Group C Japan beat Switzerland 1-0, while Cameroon thrashed Ecuador 6-0.


Ngozi Okobi

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Sweden 3-3 Nigeria highlights

Reigning champions Japan, who beat the USA in the 2011 final, secured three points through Aya Miyama’s first-half penalty in Vancouver.

The USA are pre-tournament favourites in Canada, alongside Germany, who recorded an

emphatic 10-0 win over Ivory Coast

on Sunday night.

Jill Ellis’s side have not been handed a straightforward group though, with this victory over 10th-ranked Australia coming before Friday night’s game with fifth-best team in the world Sweden.

“We were a bit nervous. We couldn’t play a lot worse at times,” said Rapinoe, 29.

“But we settled in a bit and we were able to get some goals. Three points, that’s most important, especially in this group that’s shaping up a little weird.”

The Swedes, third-place finishers in 2011, are also among the title contenders, but they made hard work of their opener.

They were 2-0 up after a Desire Oparanozie own goal and Nilla Fischer’s strike, and even though Ngozi Okobi and Asisat Oshoala brought Nigeria level, Sweden led again through Linda Sembrant, only for Francisca Ordega to equalise late on.

A Gaelle Enganamouit hat-trick helped Cameroon easily see off Ecuador, with Madeleine Ngono Mani, Christine Manie and Gabrielle Onguene also on the scoresheet.

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Republic of Ireland 0-0 England

70:26

Foul by Gary Cahill (England).

70:26

Shane Long (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

69:45

James Milner (England) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

69:45

Foul by Harry Arter (Republic of Ireland).

68:13

Attempt blocked. James Milner (England) right footed shot from the right side of the box is blocked. Assisted by Ross Barkley.

67:38

Chris Smalling (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

67:38

Foul by Jonathan Walters (Republic of Ireland).

67:01

Attempt missed. Ross Barkley (England) right footed shot from outside the box is high and wide to the right. Assisted by Jordan Henderson.

65:37 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, England. Ross Barkley replaces Jack Wilshere.

65:28 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, England. Andros Townsend replaces Raheem Sterling.

65:00

Attempt missed. Jordan Henderson (England) right footed shot from outside the box is too high. Assisted by Chris Smalling with a headed pass following a corner.

64:31

Corner, England. Conceded by Marc Wilson.

62:42 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Harry Arter replaces Glenn Whelan.

61:35

Ryan Bertrand (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

61:35

Foul by Aiden McGeady (Republic of Ireland).

61:02

Attempt saved. Jonathan Walters (Republic of Ireland) right footed shot from outside the box is saved in the top centre of the goal. Assisted by James McClean.

60:34 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Shay Given replaces Keiren Westwood.

59:54

Foul by Raheem Sterling (England).

59:54

Seamus Coleman (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

59:03

Attempt missed. Phil Jones (England) header from the centre of the box is too high following a corner.

59:02

Attempt missed. Wayne Rooney (England) header from the right side of the six yard box misses to the left. Assisted by Raheem Sterling with a cross following a corner.

58:28

Corner, England. Conceded by Aiden McGeady.

57:49

Chris Smalling (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

57:49

Foul by Shane Long (Republic of Ireland).

57:20

Attempt saved. Wayne Rooney (England) right footed shot from outside the box is saved in the top left corner.

56:24

Raheem Sterling (England) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

56:24

Foul by John O’Shea (Republic of Ireland).

55:37 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Jonathan Walters replaces Daryl Murphy.

54:59

Hand ball by Phil Jones (England).

52:38

Attempt missed. Raheem Sterling (England) right footed shot from the left side of the box misses to the right.

52:36

Attempt blocked. Jordan Henderson (England) right footed shot from outside the box is blocked.

50:46

Corner, Republic of Ireland. Conceded by Joe Hart.

49:47

Foul by Chris Smalling (England).

49:47

Seamus Coleman (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick on the right wing.

47:43

Foul by Wayne Rooney (England).

47:43

John O’Shea (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

46:24

Gary Cahill (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

46:24

Foul by Shane Long (Republic of Ireland).

45:06

James Milner (England) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

45:06

Foul by Glenn Whelan (Republic of Ireland).

45:00

Second Half begins Republic of Ireland 0, England 0.

45:00 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. James McClean replaces James McCarthy.

45:00 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Shane Long replaces David McGoldrick.

45:00 +1:04 Half time

Half Time First Half ends, Republic of Ireland 0, England 0.

45:00 +0:12

Corner, Republic of Ireland. Conceded by Ryan Bertrand.

44:37

Corner, Republic of Ireland. Conceded by Gary Cahill.

44:35

Attempt blocked. David McGoldrick (Republic of Ireland) left footed shot from the left side of the box is blocked. Assisted by Aiden McGeady.

43:40

Attempt missed. Adam Lallana (England) right footed shot from outside the box is too high. Assisted by Ryan Bertrand.

43:06 Booking

Booking James McCarthy (Republic of Ireland) is shown the yellow card for a bad foul.

43:00

Jack Wilshere (England) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

43:00

Foul by James McCarthy (Republic of Ireland).

40:37

Foul by Jack Wilshere (England).

40:37

Aiden McGeady (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

39:52

Ryan Bertrand (England) wins a free kick on the left wing.

39:52

Foul by Jeff Hendrick (Republic of Ireland).

37:47

Delay over. They are ready to continue.

37:09

Delay in match Raheem Sterling (England) because of an injury.

36:12

Foul by Daryl Murphy (Republic of Ireland).

36:12

Gary Cahill (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

35:21

Attempt missed. Daryl Murphy (Republic of Ireland) header from the centre of the box misses to the right. Assisted by Robbie Brady following a set piece situation.

34:33

Jeff Hendrick (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

34:33

Foul by James Milner (England).

32:10

Jack Wilshere (England) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

32:10

Dangerous play by Glenn Whelan (Republic of Ireland).

29:34

Corner, England. Conceded by Aiden McGeady.

26:44

Attempt missed. Daryl Murphy (Republic of Ireland) left footed shot from the right side of the box is close, but misses to the left. Assisted by Jeff Hendrick with a headed pass.

24:25

Offside, England. Jack Wilshere tries a through ball, but Wayne Rooney is caught offside.

23:44

Foul by David McGoldrick (Republic of Ireland).

23:44

Adam Lallana (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

20:15

Foul by Daryl Murphy (Republic of Ireland).

20:15

Phil Jones (England) wins a free kick on the right wing.

16:48

Attempt missed. Jeff Hendrick (Republic of Ireland) header from the centre of the box is close, but misses to the right. Assisted by Aiden McGeady with a cross following a corner.

16:28

Corner, Republic of Ireland. Conceded by Wayne Rooney.

15:49

David McGoldrick (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick on the right wing.

15:49

Foul by James Milner (England).

12:54

Attempt blocked. David McGoldrick (Republic of Ireland) header from the centre of the box is blocked. Assisted by Aiden McGeady with a cross.

11:27

Daryl Murphy (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

11:27

Foul by Chris Smalling (England).

10:05

Corner, England. Conceded by John O’Shea.

6:56

Foul by Jeff Hendrick (Republic of Ireland).

6:56

Adam Lallana (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

6:25

Corner, Republic of Ireland. Conceded by Chris Smalling.

3:44

Seamus Coleman (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

3:44

Foul by Wayne Rooney (England).

1:56

Offside, Republic of Ireland. Aiden McGeady tries a through ball, but Daryl Murphy is caught offside.

0:54

Foul by David McGoldrick (Republic of Ireland).

0:54

Wayne Rooney (England) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

0:37

Corner, Republic of Ireland. Conceded by Gary Cahill.

0:13

Corner, Republic of Ireland. Conceded by Gary Cahill.

0:11

Attempt blocked. David McGoldrick (Republic of Ireland) right footed shot from the right side of the box is blocked.

0:00

First Half begins.

0:00

Lineups are announced and players are warming up.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/32949838

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