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Australia coach McKenzie resigns

Australia coach Ewen McKenzie resigned following their

29-28 defeat

by New Zealand in Brisbane.

McKenzie oversaw defeats in Australia’s past three games and leaves less than a year before the World Cup.

The 49-year-old was also

under pressure 

because of a row over

offensive text messages back Kurtley Beale allegedly sent

about a team official in June.

“My intention was to resign win, lose or draw,” McKenzie said. “I’ve been unhappy with a bunch of things.”

McKenzie, who took over from Robbie Deans 15 months ago, added: “The easiest thing for me is to exit stage left.

“I’ll leave you guys to speculate or ponder, I’ll write a chapter in my book.”

Australian Rugby Union (ARU) chief executive Bill Pulver said: “I did not ask Ewen to resign, but understand his decision.”

Australia take on Wales, France, Ireland and England in November.

The Wallabies are also in the same group as Wales and hosts England for the 2015 World Cup.

McKenzie won 11 of his 22 Tests in charge, including a seven-match winning streak.

But defeats by South Africa and Argentina in the Rugby Championship were followed by Saturday’s loss to the All Blacks, who scored a last-minute converted try.

“Ewen is a world-class coach and a world-class individual who has been committed to playing entertaining rugby for our fans since he started in the role,” Pulver added.

Pulver hopes to appoint a new coach before Friday, when the Wallabies depart for their northern hemisphere tour.

Former South Africa coach Jake White, and Michael Cheika – who led New South Wales Waratahs to the Super Rugby title this year – are likely to be among the candidates.

Pulver said he would be seeking “a coach who can lead us to victory in next year’s Rugby World Cup, represents rugby’s core values, has the support of the playing group and is available”.

Ex-Australia prop McKenzie was assistant coach of the victorious Wallabies for the 2001 Lions tour.

He was also part of the Australia set-up that lost 20-17 to England in a dramatic 2003 World Cup final.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/rugby-union/29673323

VIDEO: Activists blockade Australian port

Hundreds of climate change protestors have attempted to disrupt shipments of coal from a port north of Sydney using their canoes, kayaks and surfboards to form a blockade.

The group included people from countries in the South Pacific who said they wanted to highlight the affects of climate change on their nations.

They said the burning of coal mined in Australia was causing sea levels to rise which will impact low-lying Pacific islands.

Jon Donnison reports from Sydney.

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Australia academic in racism row

Barry SpurrProf Spurr had advised that schools should teach less Aboriginal literature

The University of Sydney has suspended a professor and government education adviser for sending racist emails.

Prof Barry Spurr referred to Aboriginal people as “human rubbish tips” and used racist terms to refer to Muslims and Asians in Australia.

The poetry professor said the emails were part of a “whimsical” game, but students are demanding his dismissal.

In a recent review of the curriculum, Prof Spurr had advised that schools teach less Aboriginal literature.

The emails were obtained by Australian magazine New Matilda, which said they had been sent to about a dozen people, including officials and academics at the university between September 2012 and late 2014.

In them Prof Spurr refers to Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott an “Abo-lover” – an offensive term for Aborigines – and to Nelson Mandela as a “darky”.

The magazine said he also referred to the “modern Brit” as “the scum of the earth”.

‘Mocking repartee’

Prof Spurr does not deny sending the emails but told New Matilda that they were part of a “whimsical linguistic game”.

They were not a reflection of his views nor the recipients’, but were “repartee, mocking, in fact, that very kind of extreme language”, the magazine quoted him as saying.

He said he had always treated all his students with “equity and dignity”.

University of SydneyThe University of Sydney has said that racist, sexist or offensive language is not tolerated

Education Minister Christopher Pyne said in a statement the emails were a matter for Prof Spurr but called them “repugnant”.

He said the government had not made the decision to appoint Prof Spurr as a consultant for the review of the national English curriculum. He was brought on as a specialist advisor by the heads of the review, he said.

One of Prof Spurr’s contributions to the review had been to advise the government to focus less on teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander literature. Instead he advocated a stronger emphasis on Western writing.

Prof Spurr wrote that “the impact of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples on literature in English in Australia has been minimal and is vastly outweighed by the impact of global literature in English, and especially that from Britain, on our literary culture”.

Michelle Rowland, the opposition spokesperson on multiculturalism, said Mr Pyne could not just distance himself from the comments.

“The buck must surely stop with someone, and it must stop with the minister,” she told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

The University of Sydney said in a statement: “Racist, sexist or offensive language is not tolerated at the University of Sydney.”

The university has suspended Prof Spurr but the the BBC’s Jon Donnison in Sydney said students there are calling for him to be sacked.

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Activists blockade Australian port

Traditionally dressed representatives from South Pacific nations push their canoes into the water as they prepare to participate in a protest aimed at ships leaving the Newcastle coal port, located north of Sydney October 17, 2014.

Hundreds of climate change protestors have attempted to disrupt shipments of coal from a port north of Sydney using their canoes, kayaks and surfboards to form a blockade.

The group included people from countries in the South Pacific who said they wanted to highlight the effects of climate change on their nations.

They said the burning of coal mined in Australia was causing sea levels to rise which will impact low-lying Pacific islands.

About 30 Pacific Climate Warriors, as they call themselves, took to the water in traditional canoes. They had come from countries including Fiji, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Tokelau.

A traditionally dressed representative from a South Pacific nation installs a flag in a canoe on the shores of a beach as they prepare to participate in a protest aimed at ships leaving the Newcastle coal port, located north of Sydney October 17, 2014.

A spokesman said rising sea levels had already forced islanders to abandon low-lying villages.

“We are not willing to drown because of climate change. We are trying to change the narrative from ‘we are drowning’ to ‘we are not drowning, we are fighting’,” Fijian activist George Nacewa told Reuters.

They were joined by hundreds of activists from the group 350.org and others on surfboards and kayaks.

Protesters in traditional canoes and kayaks paddle in front of a ship as it leaves the Newcastle coal port, located north of Sydney October 17, 2014

The barricade at the entrance to the Port of Newcastle – the largest coal export port in the world – briefly interrupted ships heading to open waters, but no coal vessels were blocked.

Police move in to remove protesters in traditional canoes and kayaks as they paddle in front of a ship as it leaves the Newcastle coal port, located north of Sydney October 17, 2014.

Police escorted the demonstrators. There were no arrest though a number of the canoes were moved by police to make way for ships.

Police remove protesters in kayaks and traditional canoes as they paddle in front of a ship as it leaves the Newcastle coal port, located north of Sydney October 17, 2014

Australia is the worst polluter per head of population in the developed world. It is also the world’s largest coal exporter, sending more than three quarters of what it mines to countries including Japan, China, India and Korea.

Milan Loeak, the 26-year-old daughter of the president of the Marshall Islands Chris Loeak, said plans to expand the Newcastle port were “definitely going to have an effect” on Pacific islands.

“We just want to share our stories and make sure that people are aware that the decisions that are being made over here are directly affecting our islands back home,” the Australian Broadcasting Corporation quoted her as saying.

In July, the conservative government repealed a tax aimed at forcing more than 300 of the nation’s biggest polluters to pay for their carbon dioxide emissions.

Earlier this week, Prime Minister Tony Abbott said coal would be the world’s main source of energy for decades to come, angering conservationists.

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Virgin Australia buys out Tigerair

Tiger Airways planeVirgin Australia has bought out its stake in Tiger Airways Australia

Virgin Australia will buyout loss-making budget carrier Tiger Airways Australia for A$1 (£0.54).

It would take full control of Tiger Airways from its current 60% stake in an effort to speed up a turnaround.

“We will benefit from the economies of scale and achieve profitability ahead of schedule by the end of 2016,” said chief executive John Borghetti.

Virgin bought its first stake in the venture from Singapore’s Tiger Airways for A$35m last year.

Tiger Airways, however, has struggled to win customers in a slumping domestic market.

“Given the ongoing subdued consumer demand in the Australian domestic market, the growth of the Tigerair Australia domestic fleet is likely to be reduced,” Mr Borghetti said in a statement.

In August, Virgin had said its annual net loss tripled to A$355.6m due to weak consumer sentiment, the country’s carbon tax and the cost of buying the stake in Tiger Airways.

The takeover, subject to regulatory approval, is expected to be completed by the end of this year, Virgin said.

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Australia prof in racist email row

University of SydneyThe University of Sydney has said that racist, sexist or offensive language is not tolerated

The University of Sydney has suspended a professor and government education advisor for sending racist emails.

Prof Barry Spurr referred to Aboriginal people as “human rubbish tips” and used racist terms to refer to Muslims and Asians in Australia.

In a recent review of the curriculum, Prof Spurr had advised that schools teach less Aboriginal literature.

He said the emails were part of a “whimsical” game, but students are demanding that he be fired.

The emails were obtained by Australian magazine New Matilda, which said they had been sent to about a dozen people, including officials and academics at the university between September 2012 and late 2014.

In the emails Prof Spurr, a poetry professor, refers to Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott an “Abo-lover” – an offensive term for Aborigines – and to Nelson Mandela as a “darky”.

Prof Spurr does not deny sending the emails but told New Matilda that they were part of a “whimsical” game of extreme statements. He added that they were not a reflection of his views.

Education Minister Christopher Pyne said in a statement the emails were a matter for Prof Spurr but called them “repugnant”.

He said the government had not made the decision to appoint Prof Spurr as a consultant for the review of the national English curriculum. He was brought on as a specialist advisor by the heads of the review, he said.

One of Prof Spurr’s contributions to the review had been to advise the government to focus less on teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander literature. Instead he advocated a stronger emphasis on Western Judeo-Christian culture.

Michelle Rowland, the opposition spokesperson on multiculturalism, said Mr Pyne could not just distance himself from the comments.

“The buck must surely stop with someone, and it must stop with the minister,” she told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

The University of Sydney said in a statement: “Racist, sexist or offensive language is not tolerated at the University of Sydney.”

The university has suspended Prof Spurr but the the BBC’s Jon Donnison in Sydney said students there are calling for him to be sacked.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-29655458#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Asylum baby denied Australia visa

Suspected asylum seekers arrive at Christmas Island, after receiving assistance by Australian Navy, on 13 October  2012 on Christmas Island.Asylum seekers sailing to Christmas Island often arrive in rickety boats and have to be assisted by the navy

A federal court has ruled that a baby born in Australia to an asylum seeker is not entitled to a refugee visa.

Ferouz Myuddin, who is 11 months old, was born in Brisbane when his mother was transferred to hospital from a refugee detention centre on Nauru.

A judge backed the government’s earlier ruling that the baby was an “unauthorised maritime arrival” so could not claim refugee status.

Lawyers said he and 100 similar babies could now be sent to Nauru.

The hearing comes as the federal government considers amending the Migration Act to retrospectively declare all babies born to asylum seekers who arrive by boat as unauthorised maritime arrivals, irrespective of whether they were born on Australian soil.

If the amendments are passed, babies born to asylum seeker parents in Australia will have no right to apply for a permanent protection visa and should be transferred offshore.

Ferouz’s family are Muslim Rohingyas who said they fled to Myanmar (also known as Burma) to escape persecution.

They landed on Australian territory in September last year and were taken to the off-shore processing centre in Nauru. Ferouz was born prematurely after his mother was taken to hospital in Brisbane because of concerns over her pregnancy.

‘Ludicrous decision’

Immigration Minister Scott Morrison had previously denied Ferouz a protection visa – which allows refugees to live permanently in Australia – on the basis that he had arrived on Australian territory by sea illegally.

Grey line
Australia and asylum

  • Asylum seekers – mainly from Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Iraq and Iran – travel to Australia’s Christmas Island by boat from Indonesia
  • The number of boats rose sharply in 2012 and early 2013. Scores of people have died making the journey
  • To stop the influx, the government has adopted hard-line measures intended as a deterrent
  • Everyone who arrives is detained. Under a new policy, they are processed in Nauru and Papua New Guinea. Those found to be refugees will be resettled in PNG, Nauru or Cambodia
  • Tony Abbot’s government has also adopted a policy of tow-backs, or turning boats around
  • Rights groups and the UN have voiced serious concerns about the policies and accuse Australia of shirking international obligations

Australia asylum: Why is it controversial?

map

Grey line

His parents then appealed to the Federal Court but after examining how the family had entered Australia, Judge Michael Jarrett backed the government view.

He said the rule was intended to discourage people smugglers.

Lawyer Murray Watt said he was advising the Myuddin family, currently staying in a detention centre in Darwin, to appeal.

“This is a ludicrous decision given he was born here in Brisbane’s Mater Hospital and he even has a Queensland birth certificate,” ABC News quoted him as saying.

He said his firm – which is representing the families of 100 babies born in Australia to asylum seekers who arrived by boat – would be seeking assurance from the government that the families will not be moved to Nauru until the appeal is heard.

Mr Morrison welcomed the ruling, saying it has “always been the intention of successive governments that children born to illegal maritime arrivals, are taken to have the same status as their parents,” ABC News reports.

Ferouz’s family are also applying for citizenship for him as a “stateless” migrant, saying that as a Rohingya he is denied citizenship in Myanmar.

Children born in Australia to non-citizens or non-permanent residents can automatically get citizenship but only once they turn 10 and have spent most of their life in Australia.

Australia has been clamping down on asylum seekers, particularly those who arrive by boat.

Last month Australia signed a controversial deal with Cambodia to resettle refugees in the South East Asian nation. It also reintroduced temporary visas for refugees, which allow for the refugees to be sent home after a period of time if conditions in their home country are judged to have improved.

Australia’s High Court is also hearing a separate challenge over 157 asylum seekers from Sri Lanka who set out from southern India and were intercepted by Australia security in July.

They were held on a customs ship at sea for a month, initially in secret, Their lawyers argued they were illegally detained, but government lawyers said the decision was made under existing laws.

The court on Wednesday said it was reserving its decision, with a ruling not expected for some time.

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Germany 1-1 Republic of Ireland

78:43

Foul by Jonathan Walters (Republic of Ireland).

78:20

Attempt saved. Jerome Boateng (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Karim Bellarabi.

77:45

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Stephen Ward.

77:43

Attempt blocked. Antonio Rüdiger (Germany) right footed shot from long range on the right is blocked. Assisted by Mario Götze.

77:03

Offside, Republic of Ireland. David Forde tries a through ball, but Jonathan Walters is caught offside.

75:52 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Wes Hoolahan replaces Stephen Quinn.

75:31

Offside, Germany. Manuel Neuer tries a through ball, but Karim Bellarabi is caught offside.

71:25

Attempt blocked. Karim Bellarabi (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box is blocked. Assisted by Jerome Boateng.

70:14 Goal scored

Goal! Goal! Germany 1, Republic of Ireland 0. Toni Kroos (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box to the bottom right corner. Assisted by Max Kruse.

69:29 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Germany. Max Kruse replaces Julian Draxler.

66:53 Booking

Booking Marc Wilson (Republic of Ireland) is shown the yellow card for a bad foul.

66:47

Mario Götze (Germany) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

66:47

Foul by Marc Wilson (Republic of Ireland).

66:11

Foul by Thomas Müller (Germany).

66:11

John O’Shea (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

62:21 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Darron Gibson replaces Robbie Keane.

61:40

Julian Draxler (Germany) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

61:40

Foul by Marc Wilson (Republic of Ireland).

60:48

Attempt blocked. Jerome Boateng (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box is blocked.

57:07

Lukas Podolski (Germany) has gone down, but that’s a dive.

55:32

Attempt blocked. Thomas Müller (Germany) right footed shot from very close range is blocked. Assisted by Mats Hummels.

55:29

Attempt missed. Mats Hummels (Germany) header from the right side of the box misses to the left. Assisted by Mario Götze with a cross following a corner.

54:54

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Marc Wilson.

54:15

Corner, Germany. Conceded by David Forde.

54:13

Attempt saved. Toni Kroos (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box is saved in the top centre of the goal. Assisted by Mario Götze.

53:15 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Jeff Hendrick replaces Glenn Whelan because of an injury.

52:44

Corner, Germany. Conceded by David Forde.

52:41

Attempt saved. Karim Bellarabi (Germany) right footed shot from the right side of the box is saved in the bottom right corner. Assisted by Toni Kroos.

51:36

Delay over. They are ready to continue.

50:43

Delay in match Glenn Whelan (Republic of Ireland) because of an injury.

48:38

Corner, Germany. Conceded by David Forde.

48:35

Attempt saved. Lukas Podolski (Germany) left footed shot from outside the box is saved in the bottom left corner. Assisted by Toni Kroos.

48:13

Attempt blocked. Aiden McGeady (Republic of Ireland) right footed shot from the left side of the box is blocked. Assisted by Robbie Keane.

47:45

Offside, Republic of Ireland. David Forde tries a through ball, but Jonathan Walters is caught offside.

45:41

Mats Hummels (Germany) wins a free kick on the left wing.

45:41

Foul by Robbie Keane (Republic of Ireland).

45:18

Erik Durm (Germany) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

45:18

Foul by Jonathan Walters (Republic of Ireland).

45:00

Second Half begins Germany 0, Republic of Ireland 0.

45:00 Substitution

Substitution Substitution, Germany. Lukas Podolski replaces Matthias Ginter.

45:00 +1:01 Half time

Half Time First Half ends, Germany 0, Republic of Ireland 0.

45:00 +0:50

Attempt saved. Julian Draxler (Germany) left footed shot from a difficult angle on the left is saved in the bottom right corner. Assisted by Thomas Müller.

44:51

Offside, Germany. Jerome Boateng tries a through ball, but Mario Götze is caught offside.

42:48

Delay over. They are ready to continue.

41:50

Delay in match Erik Durm (Germany) because of an injury.

41:41

Foul by Erik Durm (Germany).

41:41

Aiden McGeady (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

40:06 Booking

Booking Glenn Whelan (Republic of Ireland) is shown the yellow card for a bad foul.

40:04

Toni Kroos (Germany) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

40:04

Foul by Glenn Whelan (Republic of Ireland).

39:26

Attempt missed. Matthias Ginter (Germany) header from the centre of the box is too high. Assisted by Toni Kroos with a cross following a set piece situation.

38:46

Toni Kroos (Germany) wins a free kick on the right wing.

38:46

Foul by James McClean (Republic of Ireland).

38:08

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Marc Wilson.

38:05

Attempt blocked. Thomas Müller (Germany) left footed shot from outside the box is blocked. Assisted by Toni Kroos.

31:54

Attempt saved. Antonio Rüdiger (Germany) header from the centre of the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Erik Durm.

31:23

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Marc Wilson.

25:13

Attempt missed. Toni Kroos (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box is just a bit too high. Assisted by Matthias Ginter.

23:56

Offside, Republic of Ireland. David Forde tries a through ball, but Robbie Keane is caught offside.

22:12

Foul by Thomas Müller (Germany).

22:12

Stephen Quinn (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

19:15

Attempt blocked. Matthias Ginter (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box is blocked.

17:42

Foul by Mats Hummels (Germany).

17:42

Robbie Keane (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick on the right wing.

15:04

Attempt missed. Toni Kroos (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box misses to the left. Assisted by Julian Draxler.

13:35

Attempt missed. Antonio Rüdiger (Germany) header from the centre of the box misses to the left. Assisted by Thomas Müller with a headed pass following a set piece situation.

12:28

Mario Götze (Germany) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

12:28

Foul by John O’Shea (Republic of Ireland).

8:53

Foul by Antonio Rüdiger (Germany).

8:53

Robbie Keane (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick on the left wing.

8:23

Foul by Karim Bellarabi (Germany).

8:23

James McClean (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

4:51

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Stephen Ward.

4:47

Erik Durm (Germany) hits the bar with a right footed shot from outside the box.

3:50

Attempt missed. Antonio Rüdiger (Germany) right footed shot from outside the box misses to the left.

3:26

Julian Draxler (Germany) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

3:26

Foul by Jonathan Walters (Republic of Ireland).

2:55

Foul by Karim Bellarabi (Germany).

2:55

James McClean (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

2:03

Antonio Rüdiger (Germany) wins a free kick on the right wing.

2:03

Foul by Robbie Keane (Republic of Ireland).

0:00

First Half begins.

0:00

Lineups are announced and players are warming up.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/29506564

Australia in court over asylum cases

Sri Lankan naval vessel the Samudra (L) is anchored after transferring 41 would-be asylum seekers whose boat was turned away by Australia at the southern port of Galle on 7 July 2014 Earlier this year, Australia returned a boat of asylum seekers to Sri Lanka and detained another vessel

The Australian government is facing two challenges in court on Tuesday over its policies towards asylum seekers.

The High Court is hearing the case of 157 asylum seekers who set off from India by boat. Their lawyers will argue they were illegally detained aboard an Australian customs ship for a month.

A federal court will hear the case of a boy born in Brisbane to asylum seekers.

His lawyers argue that the boy should be given permanent protection – something the government has ruled out.

Australia takes a tough line on asylum seekers who arrive by boat. They are held in offshore processing camps and, if found to be refugees, will be resettled in Papua New Guinea or Cambodia.

In recent months Australian ships have also intercepted boats at sea.

Australian Immigration Minister Scott Morrison at a press conference in Sydney on 25 July 2014The policies of Immigration Minister Scott Morrison are facing two court challenges

Some have been towed back to Indonesia – the closest jumping-off point for reaching Australia – while people on board others have been transferred into lifeboats and instructed to sail themselves back to where they started.

These policies have been criticised by rights groups and the UN, who say Australia may be failing to meet its obligations towards asylum seekers.

Intercepted

The first court case relates to a group of Sri Lankans, including Tamils, who set out from southern India. They were intercepted by Australian security personnel in July and held on a customs ship at sea for a month, initially in secret.

The case came to light after Australia detained a separate boat of Sri Lankan asylum seekers, screened their asylum claims at sea and returned them to Sri Lanka.

Grey line

map
Australia and asylum

  • Asylum seekers – mainly from Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Iraq and Iran – travel to Australia’s Christmas Island by boat from Indonesia
  • The number of boats rose sharply in 2012 and early 2013. Scores of people have died making the journey
  • To stop the influx, the government has adopted hard-line measures intended as a deterrent
  • Everyone who arrives is detained. Under a new policy, they are processed in Nauru and Papua New Guinea. Those found to be refugees will be resettled in PNG, Nauru or Cambodia
  • Tony Abbot’s government has also adopted a policy of tow-backs, or turning boats around
  • Rights groups and the UN have voiced serious concerns about the policies and conditions in the offshore camps, and accuse Australia of shirking international obligations

Australia asylum: Why is it controversial?

Grey line

Human rights activists filed a legal challenge aimed at preventing similar handling of the second group.

After a failed attempt by Australia to return them to India, they were briefly taken to the Australian mainland and then transferred to the offshore processing centre in Nauru.

Lawyers for the group will question whether the group, intercepted 16 miles from Christmas Island in Australia’s contiguous zone – therefore outside its territorial waters – were falsely imprisoned.

The Human Rights Law Centre, which is assisting, said the case would examine:

  • whether the asylum seekers’ personal circumstances were properly evaluated in any decision to detain and/or try to return them to India
  • the legality of their detention given the absence of any agreement with India to accept them back
  • whether Australia’s power to detain and return them was limited given its obligations under international law to not return people to places where they might be harmed.

Rights groups say Tamils can still face intimidation and violence in Sri Lanka, five years after the end of the civil war which pitted the majority Sinhalese Sri Lankan military against Tamil separatists.

The second case is being fought on behalf of an 11-month-old Rohingya boy who was born in a Brisbane hospital, after his mother was brought from detention in Nauru to give birth.

Under current law, those who arrived by boat after 19 July 2013 are denied protection in Australia, even if found to be genuine refugees. This includes any children they have.

The Rohingya are a stateless Muslim minority who live in western Burma. Many have fled bloody anti-Muslim violence there in recent months.

Lawyers for the baby say the case has implications for about 100 other babies born to asylum seekers on Australian soil.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-29609351#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Australian chain pulls ‘racist’ top

File picture of a Woolworths store logoWoolworths said the singlet had gone on sale by mistake and apologised

A singlet bearing a slogan seen by many as racist has been removed from supermarket shelves in Australia after it was “inadvertently” stocked.

The vest with Australia’s flag and the slogan “If you don’t love it, leave” was on sale at two Woolworths stores in Queensland and New South Wales.

A spokesman said the company would review its processes to “ensure this sort of error cannot happen again”.

Racial tensions in the country have been high after recent terror raids.

Australia has also committed troops to the conflict in the Middle East.

Woolworths said the garment had been put on sale accidentally.

“It has come to our attention that two Woolworths stores were inadvertently stocking a singlet that we consider totally unacceptable,” the spokesman told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

“The singlet was not one we ordered. It was delivered to us in error and should never [have] been allowed on our shelves.

“The sentiment expressed on the singlet does not reflect the views of Woolworths.”

A customer posted a photo of the garment on a social media account and several dozen customers complained after the image went viral.

In January German discount supermarket chain Aldi also removed a controversial t-shirt from its Australian shelves after customers complained.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-29597066#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

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