Uncategorized Archives

Historic objects return to Australia

A pearl shell ornament known as a riji or jakuli, left, and a mask made from turtle shells from the Torres Strait IslandsA pearl shell ornament, left, and a mask made from turtle shells from the Torres Strait Islands

A collection of rare objects, including a shield thought to have been picked up by Captain Cook in 1770, are set to return to Australia for the first time.

The exhibition is part of a new deal signed between the National Museum of Australia and the British Museum.

It will feature 151 indigenous objects, most of which have not been seen in Australia since they were collected.

National Museum director Mathew Trinca said the exhibition will “encourage Australians to consider their history”.

‘Remarkable treasures’

“This is an important exhibition for our nation. It includes objects from the very earliest contacts between indigenous and non-indigenous people in this country right to the present day,” Mr Trinca told the Canberra Times.

He said displaying the “remarkable treasures” was the culmination of “an extraordinary process of consultation with 25 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across Australia over several years”.

Peter Yu, chair of the National Museum Indigenous Advisory Committee, said: “Addressing these sometimes confronting issues and exploring the complex history of early encounters… is a crucial component of reconciliation.”

Shield collected at Botany Bay during Captain Cook's visit, 1770A shield thought to have been collected by Captain Cook at Botany Bay in April 1770

A detail from Yumari by Uta Uta TjangalaA detail from Yumari by Uta Uta Tjangala, which is on show in London as part of the museums’ deal

The Encounters exhibition will open in November. It will be followed in 2016 by the British Museum’s acclaimed A History of the World in 100 Objects and the third exhibition of the series will come to Canberra in 2018.

Arts Minister George Brandis welcomed the “significant” partnership, saying it will give Australians “a remarkable opportunity to view objects from the world’s oldest national public museum”.

“It will also encourage cultural exchange and provide a platform to showcase our rich Australian heritage to audiences overseas,” he added.

The iconic Yumari canvas by renowned Papunya artist Uta Uta Tjangala is one of the National Museum objects being sent to the British Museum to be part of a sister exhibition.

Indigenous Australia: enduring civilisation, which opens in London in April, is the first in the UK devoted to the history and culture of both Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-31653858#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Australia’s Qantas returns to profit

JoyceQantas chief executive Alan Joyce has been reducing costs aggressively since 2013

Australia’s national carrier Qantas has reported its best half-year profit in four years, as turnaround plans come to fruition.

On Thursday, the firm reported an underlying profit of 367m Australian dollars ($289.3m; £186.3m) for the six months to December.

The positive results come after the firm reported its biggest ever annual loss for the 12 months to June 2014.

Shares in the Sydney-listed airline rose more than 6% following the news.

The national flag carrier has been facing tough competition in both international and domestic markets.

Ellis Taylor, of aviation news site Flightglobal, told the BBC the results were “a massive turnaround”.

“The firm’s cost cuts are really starting to bear results and I think this bodes well for the rest of the financial year,” he said.

“The big improvement has been shown in all the arms of Qantas, including the troublesome international operation.”

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce said the firm was “meeting or exceeding all our targets as we build a sustainable future”.

In 2013, the company announced a massive cost cutting programme that would include some 5,000 job losses.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-31635239#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Australia warning on women militants

Up to 40 Australian women have either taken part in terrorism or supported terrorist groups, officials say.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has said that an increasing number of young women are joining Islamic State (IS).

She told parliament that more women were travelling to Syria and Iraq to join their militant husbands or to marry a fighter.

Experts are worried about the effect of returnees, and on those who support them, on domestic security.

‘Sexual slaves’

Dozens of Australian nationals are thought to be fighting for IS in Iraq and Syria.

On Wednesday, Ms Bishop said that women account for nearly one-fifth of all foreign fighters there.

She said that it “defied logic” that women would join groups such as IS.

“If the killings and executions aren’t enough, Daesh (IS) has published instructions on the treatment of sexual slaves which includes raping and beating women,” she said, as quoted in ABC News.

Fighters of the Islamic State wave the group's flag from a damaged display of a government fighter jet following the battle for the Tabqa air base, in Raqqa, SyriaDozens of Australians are thought to have joined IS in Iraq and Syria

“Even children are not immune with instructions encouraging sexual assault on girls who’ve not yet reached puberty.”

Ms Bishop called for family and friends to reach out to vulnerable young people to prevent them from being radicalised.

Growing threat

In another development, an Australian man fighting with Kurdish militants against IS has been killed.

The UK-based Syrian Observatory said that he died on Tuesday in an IS attack on the YPG militia in north-eastern Syria.

Observatory director Rami Abdel Rahman told AFP news agency: “The YPG isn’t actively recruiting foreigners, but people from countries like Canada, the United States, Britain, Spain, Australia, Holland, Austria and France have travelled to Syria to join their ranks.”

Fighters of the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) carry their weapons and use a pair of binoculars in the outskirts of Tal Tamr town as they monitor the movements of Islamic State fightersAn Australian fighting with Kurdish forces against IS was killed on Tuesday

Officials have warned that Australia faces a growing threat from radical Islamists.

On Monday Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced a push to toughen citizenship laws in an attempt to target domestic extremists.

“Australians who take up arms with terrorist groups, especially while Australian military personnel are engaged in Afghanistan and Iraq, have sided against our country and should be treated accordingly,” he said.

For dual nationals, this means revoking or suspending citizenship. He added that people born in Australia could also lose some privileges if they broke anti-terror laws.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-31633862#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Nervy Ireland beat UAE in World Cup

Gary Wilson hit 80 to help Ireland to a nervy two-wicket World Cup win over United Arab Emirates in Brisbane.

Shaiman Anwar scored a maiden ODI century as the UAE part-timers hit 147 from their last 15 overs to post 278-9.

They then pegged Ireland back to 97-4, but Kevin O’Brien (50) and Wilson put on 72 from 36 balls for the sixth wicket to help rebuild the innings.

Ireland, who have two wins from their opening two Pool B games, next face South Africa in Canberra on 3 March.

O’Brien and Wilson were both dismissed as William Porterfield’s side closed in on the target, but Brisbane-born Alex Cusack and off-spinner George Dockrell kept their nerve to lead Ireland to victory with just four balls to spare.

Listen to highlights from Test Match Special’s and 5 live Sport’s 2015 Cricket World Cup coverage

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cricket/31621720

Australia Post’s profit down 56%

Australia PostAustralia Post says it has been carefully managing a decline in its letter volumes for the past seven years

Australia Post has reported a 56% fall in its half-year profit from a year earlier, and has forecast its first full-year loss in more than 30 years.

The government-owned firm said on Monday its after-tax profit for the six months to 31 December was A$98m Australian dollars ($76.7m; £49.9m).

The fall in profit was driven by widening losses in its letter business.

Managing director Ahmed Fahour said urgent regulatory reform of the rules around its letter services was needed.

Australia Post is seeking government approval to introduce a two-speed mail delivery service within its normal mail delivery timetable.

“The immediate challenge for our business is clear,” Mr Fahour said.

“We have been carefully managing the real decline in our letter volumes for the past seven years.

“But we have now reached a tipping point where we can no longer manage that decline, while also maintaining our nationwide networks, service reliability and profitability,” he said.

The firm reported a loss of A$151m its letters business for the period – which was 57% worse than last year’s loss.

Revenue from parcel services was up 4% for the period compared to a year earlier, but the firm forecast that losses in its letter business would likely overwhelm any boost from its seasonally quieter parcel business in the coming months.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/31580780#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Australia strips Harris of honours

Rolf HarrisHarris has been jailed for nearly six years for indecent assaults on four girls

Rolf Harris has been stripped of his Australian honours after his conviction last year for child sex offences.

A brief statement said that the disgraced entertainer’s appointments as Officer and Member of the Order of Australia had been terminated by Governor General Peter Cosgrove.

Harris, 84, was jailed in July 2014 for nearly six years for 12 indecent assaults against four girls.

The offences took place between 1968 and 1986.

Australia operates a separate honours system to that of the UK. Harris has also been awarded honours under the UK system.

He has appeared on TV screens as a children’s entertainer and songwriter.

He is also an artist and painted a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II to mark her 80th birthday in 2006.

Earlier this month he was again questioned by police regarding sex offence allegations.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-31581719#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

The rise of Australia’s visual effects industry

Indiana Jones publicity stillThe first Indian Jones films in the 1980s included only a few visual effects

In Bryan Singer’s X-Men: Days of Future Past the character Quicksilver pauses time.

Quicksilver – under attack in the Pentagon kitchen – dodges bullets, moving them by hand. They smash instead through the rain, shattering droplets of water. Meanwhile pots, pans, and vegetables hang in mid-air.

Now Rising Sun Pictures, the Adelaide-based visual effects company responsible for X-Men’s “Pentagon kitchen” scene, is up for an Oscar for Best Visual Effects.

Tim Crosbie, Rising Sun’s VFX superviser, is one of only two Australians to be nominated at this year’s Academy Awards, held on 22 February in Los Angeles. The other is David Lee as part of a team nominated for best sound mixing on Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken.

Delivering complexity

X-Men will be pitted against Guardians of the Galaxy, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Interstellar.

X-Men: Pentagon kitchen scene before special effects are addedX-Men’s “pentagon kitchen”: the real stuff…

X-Men Pentagon kitchen scene after special effects are added…and the finished product with special effects

“To be nominated amongst the best in the world is extraordinary,” says Tony Clark, Rising Sun co-founder and director. “I don’t think we ever really dreamed we would achieve the level of work that we have.”

Rising Sun is riding the wave of an industry boom. In 1989, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade included just 80 visual effects shots. Two decades later the blockbuster Avatar had over 3,000.

“What the industry has now achieved is the ability to deliver complexity,” says Mr Clark. “There is nothing that can’t be done in computer graphics now, except [convincing] digital humans.”

Rising Sun, now celebrating its 20th year, has delivered visual effects in 120 movies, including the scene when the space station re-enters Earth’s atmosphere in Gravity.

Now they are working on Tarzan, Pan, and The Gods of Egypt.

Teething problems

Other Australian visual effects companies are also making an impact.

Tony Clark, Rising Sun co-founder and directorTony Clark says creating visual effects is labour-intensive work

Animal Logic (The LEGO Movie) and Iloura (Ted) are both respected international players. In 2012, US-based Luma Pictures opened a Melbourne office.

In recent years, generous tax breaks and government subsidies have attracted Hollywood to Australia.

Productions need a budget of just A$500,000 ($390,000, £252,000) to qualify for a Post, Digital and Visual effects (PDV) tax credit of 30% in Australia – up from 15% in 2011.

“It keeps us in the game [and] competing internationally,” says industry body Ausfilm Chief Executive Officer Debra Richards.

Step oneThe way to do it: step one…

Step two…step two

Final product…and what audiences see on the big screen

Yet, in a relatively young industry beset by teething problems, even an Oscar has not been able to prevent closure for certain companies.

Just two weeks before winning an Oscar for visual effects in Life of Pi in 2013, American firm Rhythm Hues filed for bankruptcy.

James Cameron’s Digital Domain facility, also an Oscar-winner, had filed for bankruptcy five months earlier.

Their demise raised the question: why are visual effects firms struggling in an era when their work dominates the box office, helping to rake in millions in revenue for studios?

“They were victims of two things: one, the global incentive market and two, a failure to roll with the times,” says Mr Clark.

Inconsistent market

Countries such as Australia have muscled in on an industry once dominated by California. Instantaneous communications has made collaboration across oceans possible.

Oscar statues are shown in preparation for the 87th Academy Awards in HollywoodThe stage is being set for this year’s Academy Awards to be held on 22 February

But Australia has also suffered. The Dr D studios, established by director George Miller of Mad Max fame, closed its Sydney production facility in 2013.

A year earlier Fuel VFX went into voluntary administration before being acquired by Animal Logic.

In Australia, competition from Canada combined with an (up until recently) strong Australian dollar to add pressure to an inconsistent market that lives – or dies – through contractual work.

“Unfortunately our location incentive is not competitive compared with [other] global incentives,” says Mr Clark. “It has been quiet in the last few years, particularly due to exchange rates and location incentives.”

“You might miss out on an opportunity because timing is everything,” adds Simon Rosenthal, head of VFX for Iloura, who cites the industry’s cyclical nature as a major challenge.

“That and maintaining the work force here – a high level of expertise is required.”

To keep the market competitive, studios often dole out scenes from a single film to multiple companies, who also invest in research and development to stay ahead of their competitors.

Iloura spends about 20% of its time investing in research and development.

Mr Rosenthal calls his team “a bunch of boffins: modellers who build the objects, riggers who build the internal muscle skeletal system, texture artists who apply the surface, animators who make the thing move, FX artists who blow it up”.

‘Doing things by hand’

It’s a labour intensive business. For example, a team of more than 60 people at Rising Sun took about six months to create the Pentagon Kitchen scene.

There is a risk that Australia might one day be undercut by India and China. Both countries have thriving film industries and cheap labour costs. Both are now looking at increasing their visual effects know-how.

For now, thanks to a recent fall in the Australian dollar, Mr Clark expects more work will flow here.

Whether or not Rising Sun wins an Oscar on Sunday he hopes viewers appreciate the artistry behind those flying saucepans.

“Everyone thinks it is [just] done by the computer. But everything we do is about people doing things by hand – they are using computers as a tool and a paintbrush.”

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-31545807#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Rain ruins Australia v Bangladesh

Australia’s World Cup Pool A match against Bangladesh in Brisbane was abandoned without a ball being bowled.

Heavy rain overnight and throughout the day prevented any play at the Gabba.

Both sides took one point from the game and are level on three points in the group, three behind leaders New Zealand.

It is only the second World Cup match to be washed out completely, after Sri Lanka against West Indies at The Oval in 1979.

The weather prevented captain Michael Clarke from making his return from a hamstring injury, the Australia captain having missed the co-hosts’

111-run win over England

on the first day of the tournament.

Clarke has not played a competitive international since having surgery in December, but

made 64

in the World Cup warm-up win over the United Arab Emirates.

Bangladesh, who

beat Afghanistan

in their World Cup opener, face Sri Lanka in Melbourne on Thursday, while Australia play unbeaten New Zealand in Auckland on Saturday.

England sit bottom of Pool A after losing their first two games. Their next match is against Scotland in Christchurch on Monday.

The top four teams from each group qualify for the quarter-finals.

Listen to highlights from Test Match Special’s and 5 live Sport’s 2015 Cricket World Cup coverage

Pool A

Team

Played

Won

Lost

N/R

R/R

Points

1

New Zealand

3

3

0

0

+3.59

6

2

Australia

2

1

0

1

+2.22

3

3

Bangladesh

2

1

0

1

+2.10

3

4

Sri Lanka

1

0

1

0

-1.96

0

5

Afghanistan

1

0

1

0

-2.10

0

6

Scotland

1

0

1

0

-3.04

0

7

England

2

0

2

0

-3.95

0

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza shelters from the rain

Bangladesh fans

Bangladesh have won only one of their 19 completed ODIs against Australia

Australia fans

The Gabba hosts Ireland’s match against the United Arab Emirates on Wednesday

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cricket/31545382

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk speaks to the media along side the Queensland Police Service Deputy Commissioner Steve Gollschewski and Interpreter Mark Cave, aka #SignGuy

An Australian sign language interpreter who translated the Queensland Premier’s live Cyclone Marcia press conference has made waves on social media. But what did his energetic performance add to the important storm information being broadcast?

A number of sign language interpreters have hit the headlines in the past few years for their show-stealing performances at public events. In 2013, viewers of the Nelson Mandela memorial called out an interpreter for not using correct South African sign language.

In 2012, Lydia Callis, who interpreted at live press conference updates for New York’s Mayor Bloomberg during Superstorm Sandy, shot to fame for her energetic translations. It’s thought that people take particular note of the interpreter because it’s a novelty that they don’t see on their screens too often.

The latest one to go viral comes from Australia.

Mark Cave has been widely praised by deaf and hearing tweeters alike for his interpretation of Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk’s live updates on the status of Tropical Cyclone Marcia. He is “doing so much for AUSLAN and understanding”, one Tweeter said of the 30-year-old. AUSLAN is Australian sign language, the UK equivalent is BSL. Another tweeter pointed out that sign language is “a must for all emergency events”. Some users aren’t fluent in English so can’t benefit from subtitles.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk speaks to the media along side the Queensland Police Service Deputy Commissioner Steve Gollschewski and Interpreter Mark Cave, aka #SignGuyCave interprets for Annastacia Palaszczuk and the Queensland Police Service Deputy Commissioner Steve Gollschewski

“Interpreters are seen on TV screens during emergencies like Cyclone Marcia or Superstorm Sandy because that’s the best way for authorities to ensure that deaf people who use sign language get the message that everyone else is getting,” says Charlie Swinbourne, editor of deaf community blog The Limping Chicken.

Sign language, he says, incorporates not only hand movements, but body language and facial expressions too. Just as hearing people might modify the tone of their voice, Swinbourne says that interpreters have to be more animated than usual when translating information in emergency situations, to convey their seriousness. “To a non-signing audience, those relatively dramatic signs, for words like ‘storm’, really stand out,” he says.

People with no connection to the deaf community have described Cave’s animated performance as “hilarious”, “entertaining”, “poetic” and “mesmerising”, like an “interpretive dancer”. @Lou_OMara loves the interpreter’s facial expressions, saying that he should be on children’s television show Play School.

Comments on Twitter

Sign language interpreter Rob Troy says that sometimes translations might come across as slightly over the top because “we are not always aware of how we look when the complexities of the situation take over. It is this dissonance between what we portray and what we believe we are portraying that makes sign language interpreting so interesting, and at times comedic, for the audience.”

Some tweeters made it clear that their attention had been drawn to Cave, rather than the Queensland Premier. @VisionInvesting wrote that #signguy was “making an update on cyclone and being translated by some lady”. “We muted and made up our own commentary”, @JanHan29 said.

Troy says that while “it is always important to respect the speaker when interpreting a one-way event”, it is not something that is always at the forefront of his mind. “In that very moment, I am concentrating on delivering the message”, he says.

Twitter came alive with jokes about the Australian interpreter’s impact, with viewers using the hashtag #signguy over 1,000 times in 24 hours. @aus_pm, a fake account for the country’s prime minister Tony Abbott, tweeted: “Maybe #signguy wants to be Chief Whip? I’ll ask.”

Follow @BBCOuch on Twitter and on Facebook, and listen to our monthly talk show

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-ouch-31558277#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Powerful cyclones hit Australia

People duck waves on the Australian Gold Coast (20 Feb 2015)Some Australians were not heeding emergency warnings

Two major storms have slammed into Australia, knocking out power, damaging homes and forcing evacuations in coastal areas.

Tropical Cyclone Marcia hit the Queensland coast between Yeppoon and St Lawrence on Friday morning local time.

Arriving with little warning as a Category Five storm, it has now been downgraded to a Two but still threatens high tides and heavy rain.

Separately, Tropical Cyclone Lam hit a remote area of the Northern Territory.

‘Terrifying experience’

In its latest update, the BOM said Marcia had weakened to a Category Two cyclone, with sustained winds of 110km/h (72mph) and gusts of up to 155km/h.

It was about about 60km west of the town of Gladstone, Queensland and 65km north-northeast of Biloela, and moving south-southeast at 18 kmh but expected to weaken below cyclone strength by Saturday morning.

Strong winds and waves hit the coastal town of Yeppoon in north Queensland on 20 February 2015 after Tropical Cyclone Marcia made landfall“Destructive winds” battered coastal and island communities including Yeppoon in Queensland

Driving rain and high winds from Cyclone Marcia hit Yeppoon, Queensland, Australia, on 20 February 2015 About 870 Yeppoon homes were evacuated because of possible storm surges

Surfers during Tropical Cyclone Marcia at Snapper Rocks on the Gold Coast (20 Feb 2015)Surfers off the Gold Coast made the most of the rough sea conditions

The BoM warned of abnormally high tides and said people in coastal areas should be ready evacuate if necessary.

Earlier on Friday, the storm passed through Rockhampton and Yeppoon, where Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said people of had gone through a “terrifying experience”.

“We are very, very thankful that we have avoided the worst of what could’ve been an absolute catastrophe if those winds had escalated and the Category Five had gone straight over Yeppoon,” she told reporters in Brisbane.

Ms Palaszczuk said earlier that 33,000 residences were without power in the Livingstone/Yeppoon area and 20,000 in Rockhampton.

There were no reports of injuries, but some homes and businesses suffered significant structural damage, she tweeted.



Tropical Cyclone Marcia in the Coral Sea

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.

Darren Ferguson is on Great Keppel Island, where winds are up to 150 km/h

In Yeppoon, about 870 homes were evacuated because of storm surges, according to Queensland emergency authorities.

More than 170 schools and childcare centres had been closed, and people evacuated or moved to safety on both Lady Elliot Island and Heron Island, on the Great Barrier Reef.



ABC's weather forecast showing the storm

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.

Rockhampton Mayor Margaret Strelow spoke to the BBC just before Marcia was due to hit the town

The mayor of Rockhampton, Margaret Strelow, told ABC Radio that Marcia was like “a real moving beast” as it appeared to head first to the west of the city and then to the east.

Further south, local media reported that 90,000 sandbags had so far been handed out across Queensland’s major city, Brisbane, because of predictions of heavy rain and flooding.

Describing the cyclone as “very serious”, Prime Minister Tony Abbott said: “Let’s hope we can get through it without any loss of life.”

Roads impassable

Cyclone Lam, which arrived as a Category Four, struck close to the tiny and remote indigenous settlements of Elcho and Goulburn Island, east of Darwin.

Some communities had been evacuated ahead of the storm, but others spent the day in emergency shelters.

Evacuated children from Warruwi community attend class in Darwin, Northern Territory (20 Feb 2015)These children were evacuated to Darwin along with their entire community from Goulburn Island

Regional police commander Bruce Porter said Elcho Island had no power or water, and that there had been “substantial” damage.

“Initial reports are the airstrip is still intact but covered with debris,” the AFP news agency quoted him as saying.

“There are downed power lines. There are a number of trees down and many roads are impassable and we do have a number of buildings and houses that have been severely damaged.”

Lam has now been downgraded to a tropical low, but Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) warned of further “squally thunderstorms” and high tides.

Cyclones Lam (top) and MarciaSatellite images of Cyclones Lam (top) and Marcia

line

Are you in Queensland? Have you been affected by the storm? You can email haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk with your experience. Please include a telephone number if you are willing to be contacted by a BBC journalist.

Or comment here:

Have your say

Send your pictures and videos to yourpics@bbc.co.uk or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (international). Or you can upload here.

Read the terms and conditions.

Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-31544694#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

 Page 1 of 94  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »